Biblical Genesis Ten Patriarchs Ancient Israel Geography Ostensibly Prehistoric Kebaran Natufian Culture Tribes Canaan Tsur Surriya Tyre Name Syria Hethites Hittites Round Houses Grain Grinding Obsidian Flint Weapons Tools Paleolithic Levant Israel Proofs Genesis Account Redemption Indications Historicity Torah Hebrew Rabbis Holy Land

The believing Jews in Israel must really be torn between what the Bible clearly says in Genesis and what their best and brightest are telling them about ancient history there in the Holy Land.  Darwinists who seem to dominate science in Israel (as elsewhere) are telling the Jews that ‘though the Torah indicates the earliest inhabitants of Canaan were Canaanites circa 2300 b.c.,  the (ostensible) reality is that proto humans or some such have lived there for thirty thousand years, so what’s a Hebrew to do?

The so-called Kebaran Culture built round, semi-subterranean houses, with paved floors, and they hunted gazelles and aurochs which abounded there during the Ice Age, when they harvested nuts and seeds which required no irrigation, not what’s seen today there where irrigation is necessitated and commonplace, making geographically tiny Israel the agricultural giant of the Middle East, but now back to the Kebarans, they lived there supposedly twenty thousand years ago, for ten thousand years before the so-called Natufian people took over, replacing the round houses with the box-like houses which dominated thereafter.

So that would have been twenty-thousand years of house building, by a total of millions of people through all those years, but where are the ruins and refuse from those many hundreds of thousands (if not millions) of households?  The prime geographic locations on hills near streams or springs should be covered with housing remains from twenty-thousand years of occupation, so where are they?  You’ll certainly have to ask “the experts” in Israel, and so, be of good cheer you Bible-believing rabbis, the biblical account is to believe.

And see http://genesisveracityfoundation.com.

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