Star Mapping Atlantean Formorians (Moors) of Morocco Settled Ice Age United Kingdom to Build Stonehenge and Newgrange Megalithic Observatories and Mine for Tin for Atlantis Bronze Production

Tin was the key but rare component for the production of Bronze in the ancient world, when the seafaring Canaanites, Greeks, Egyptians, and Minoans, were competing to explore for, and exploit, the relatively rare tin reserves of the world, to combine with the more abundant copper to make the far more durable bronze, for weapons, construction tools, and ornaments.

Canaanites inhabited Morocco and Libya during this time, during the Ice Age.  They were great navigators, later known as the Phoenicians, their patriarchs were Sidon and his son Atlas, so they were Atlanteans, and the “Formoriacchi” (Men of Morocco) were the first inhabitants of modern-day Britain, “the Tin Islands,” as they were known to the Phoenicians, some of whose ancestors were the Formorians of ancient British and Irish lore, the first settlers there, during the Ice Age, the progeny of Canaan, a son of Ham.

The megalithic observatories of the U.K., Stonehenge and Newgrange, among others, were built to measure the movements of the stars and planets, for religious purposes, as well as, for navigational purposes, astrology for relgion, and astronomy to navigate the high seas.  These are generally thought to have been built circa 2000 B.C., when the Formorians, the Men of Morocco, later known as the Moors, controlled the mines and shipping lanes of England.

The Romans expunged the Formorian names from British records around the time of Christ, and Saints Patrick and Augustine of the Roman Catholic church destroyed many volumes of astronomical records and histories from the ancient Formorian Brits, but the evidence for their astronomical expertise is acknowledged with the ruins of their megalithic observatories, and British and Irish lore include ancestries going back to these first settlers there, the Formorians, the men of Morocco.

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